HOFNER POT CODES – FACT FILE

If the serial number of an electric guitar is missing or is no longer readable, you can also find the approximate age of the guitar on the basis of the potentiometers. On the potentiometer is a code that gives information about the manufacturer and the year and week when it is made. EIA code. Where to find the code Stamped or punched you can see a six- or seven-digit EIA code on the back or side of the potentiometer. The potentiometers pots on the guitar offer a oppotunity to find the production date by a EIA Electronics Industry Association code. Assuming that the pots are original and have not been replaced, the production year of the guitar can be determined approximately. The EIA code on pots indicates the manufacturer and date when they are made.

Potentiometer Codes On Gibson Bass Guitars

Seriously though, the best way to date a vintage SG is not through the serial number, but rather by the potentiometer codes and other features it has. Only in did Gibson switch to a more reliable serial number system which can be trusted as a dating tool. Even then, you want to have a rough idea of when it was made based on the features first, because they have used several different serial number formats through the years. It is important to remember that no one feature is the absolute determinant factor in dating, but rather the totality of all features taken into consideration.

It is not normal for any other vintage SG to have remarkably low frets.

Looks like an SG-1 from the mid 70s. Check the date code on the pots for a better idea of what year it was made.

These pedals have been turning up on ebay for the last few years. They are coming from California. But they did not use all MXR parts and the pedals are often not very well made. Here is an “MXR” envelope filter I got in for some mods. Note that the parts are random, some carbon comp resistors, some film. Also note the parts are not put in straight and some have some leads soldered together on this side of the board for some reason.

The original pots are the only way to date an MXR pedal, so this pedal is not very valuable even if someone could get it working, as the date codes and pots are gone. See my FAQ for date code decoding info.

Properly Dating a Fender Bass

HI Everyone:. Came up with a cool, yard sale deal. Get this, An early 70’s LPC with a lot of damage and a crappy headstock repair. Looks like a Pete Townsand got hold of it. Pancake body.

FENDER AMP Chassis Serial Number DATE CODES On 3 digit date codes, you have to “guess” the decade of the pot or speaker. Usually this isn’t too difficult​.

Ever since Fender started making basses in , they dated certain parts and components to give a general idea of when the instrument was produced. Then there are pickup and potentiometer date codes, serial numbers, and even bridge stamps and pickguard codes in some cases. So how do you properly determine the year of production? They just grabbed whatever part or component was ready and put the instrument together to fill an order as fast as possible.

The general rule of thumb is that a bass is as old as its newest part, or at least its latest dated part. So, if you have a Fender with a neck date of and the pots are dated , then you have a Fender Bass. There are some years in particular that can get really tricky. Some Precision Basses have no neck date stamp at all, and several Fender basses from to have neck stamp codes that are difficult to decipher and sometimes impossible to read.

Body stamp dates were used by Fender from the early s to the mids, after which they stopped until the s where they started again sporadically to this day. Potentiometer codes are pretty reliable for dating, usually indicating the year and week it was made. One exception is that most Fender pots from to are dated to Pickups were only date stamped from to about , but they can be really useful in helping pin down the year.

Serial numbers can also be tricky when trying to get an accurate build date.

1963-1966 Magnatone Custom Series Dating

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POT CODES – All vintage USA Big Muffs have source-date codes stamped on the underside of the potentiometer cans, or “pots”. The pots are what the knobs are.

The number has become a popular code for marijuana. Where does the term come from and why did it catch on, asks Aidan Lewis. That autumn, the five teenagers came into possession of a hand-drawn map supposedly locating a marijuana crop at Point Reyes, north-west of San Francisco. The friends – who called themselves the Waldos because they used to hang out by a wall – met after school, at pm, and drove off on their treasure hunt. They never found the plot. So did friends and acquaintances, who included – at a couple of steps removed – members of the Grateful Dead rock band.

The term spread among the band’s fans, known as Deadheads. Staff on the magazine, long the leading publication on marijuana, started using it. They held ideas meetings at 4. Twenty years later another publication, Magazine, reported a claim by a rival group of San Rafael old boys that they had invented the term. But the Waldos, who have shown letters and other items to High Times, vigorously defend their version.

Potentiometer codes

Copyright Kit Rae. The pots are what the knobs are mounted to, essentally manually adjustable resisitors that control the voltage across a circuit. The codes were created by the Electronic Industries Association EIA in s to identify the product source and date of manufacture. The first string of numbers is usually the part number, or sometimes the pot value. In the second string of numbers, the first three numbers are a code identifying the manufacturer.

The next two numbers after the manufacturer number are the year, and the last two numbers are the week of the year the pots were made.

The original pots are the only way to date an MXR pedal, so this pedal is not very valuable even if someone could get it working, as the date codes and pots are.

Did you know that the parts inside your vintage electric guitar will likely have manufacturing date codes? These parts, if original, are one date point that vintage guitar shops will use to help date your vintage Fender or Gibson guitar. Both guitar players and guitar collectors will often search for guitars starting with a year or a time period to find their dream guitar. If you’re looking to find the value of your vintage Fender or Gibson guitar, it’s important to start by find the year your guitar was made.

Potentiometer codes can often help inform that finding and add another data point in assigning value. Fender used at least four different serializing schemes from to

HOFNER POT CODES – FACT FILE

Zachary R. Fjestad is a freelance writer who specializes in guitars and amplifiers including the history behind them and their current value. Fjestad has been evaluating and appraising guitars for over 20 years. For more information, email Zachary at zacharyfjestad hotmail.

When dating an instrument using pot codes, it is important to remember that pots can be changed, or fitted way after they themselves were made, so any.

Early electric versions of Hofner models can be roughly dated by some of the components used. In particular, the rectangular and oval consoles were fitted with ‘Preh’ brand volume control potentiometers – “pots”, which carry a manufacture date in code on them. S imply undo the small screws holding the panel on, and lift it out of the body. It may be useful to have a cloth to lay it on, to protect the finish of the guitar.

T his is the underside of one of the ‘Preh’ brand pots – the code is stamped into the brown fibreboard base. The first part, K is simply the resistance value of the component, and has no relevance for dating. The numbers following are the ones to note. Quite simply, it is a composite of the number of the week in which the component was made, and the last digit of the year in question: week , plus year ending. The code can therefore be either two or three numbers: ’90’ would be the 9th week of , ” the 10th week, and so on.

So, in this case, ” means the 34th week of – somewhere towards the end of August.

Dating a Rat

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I read on a Gibson forum that, on seven-digit pot codes, the fourth and fifth Checking the date codes on pots is usually the second step (after.

Dating you’ve been reading articles pots dating a vintage guitar, you may reading have come across mention of pot codes. The pots, or potentiometers to give their full name, are the variable resistors that control volume and tone. Better quality pots are often stamped with a number of codes; typically part numbers, date of production, pots codes and dating values. Many pots don’t carry example of this information, but the better quality guitars produced in America regularly do.

Codes where are these codes? Normally they are stamped or inked onto the back or sides of the pot. So reading them will require opening control cavities, removing scratchplates, or in the case codes a semi acoustic, removing the pots entirely. Codes can be codes, obscured by solder and other components, or simply very small.

The Key to Media’s Hidden Codes – Ben Beaton